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20130113
20130121
STATION
CSPAN 3
MSNBCW 2
CNBC 1
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2013 7:00am EST
wanted to make a comment about the tax code system. it's so complicated. i think that the government wants to do something to help out the economy, they could institute a fair tax or a flat tax, something like the libertarian candidate gary johnson was advocating last year where if you buy something you just pay the tax on it, there is no more income tax or corporate tax but a consumption type flat tax. host: do you think that would work? caller: i think that would eliminate all these loopholes people take twn tax code system. if you're married, own a house, have children, you get all these deductions and if you don't have any of those things, then you don't get to take any of those deductions so it's just not fair. if your income comes from capital gains there is a different tax rate for you. if the government wants to help bring the economy back, make everything fair across the board as far as taxes go. host: thanks for the call. we welcome our listeners and our focus this morning the role of government in solving america's problems. it was something that dwight eisenhower talked a
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2013 7:00am EST
, such as taxes and insurance, generally cannot add up to more than 43% of their monthly gross income. no standard is perfect, but the standard here provides a clear line with a measure of protection to borrowers that have increased certainty in the mortgage market. host: i want to bring in a few callers on this subject for you. oklahoma city, oklahoma, democratic line. good morning, vernon. caller: i am tickled to death that the government is setting the rules for the financial industry when it comes to the home market. people worked all their lives to provide a home and held for ways to get it paid off before they retire. this is the one area that the government needs to regulate and regulate closely and i am glad we're finally doing that. now, of course, we have drawn a line in the sand that we can hopefully reclaim. can we hope that it will ever change back to what we thought we had been through? guest: an excellent question. another one to add to that is -- will the regulators have the appetite to regulate this closely? making sure that banks are abiding by these rules? we had a system going
CNBC
Jan 16, 2013 6:00am EST
million r tax adjustment and $376 million from something and $700 million from reduced mortgage loan loss. jamie dimon said challenges still exist but as we look forward to 2013 -- let me finish this thought, we look forward -- we remain optimistic. we're committed to doing our part to speed the recovery of the housing market and we continue to see favorable credit conditions across our wholesale loan portfolios. at first blush. go ahead, andrew. introduce chris. >> chris whalen is here to respond to these numbers. i'm here to say they also put out on their website today. what do you make of these numbers? >> similar to welles making up a lot of earnings numbers with cost cutting, very important. a little light on revenue, i think the story of most banks going into 2013. my guess is interest margins continuing to squeeze because of the fed. >> that's not going to get better. >> the benefit from the fed has gone by on net and tt an alarmi rate and the time's gone >> what's your thoughts on loan growth. >> as jamie said he's trying hard to put on assets, everyone in the industry is. but wit
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2013 10:00am EST
burden on the bar were. monthly deaths of the consumer, such as taxes and insurance, generally cannot add up to more than 43% of their monthly gross income. no standard is perfect, but the standard here provides a clear line with a measure of protection to borrowers that have increased certainty in the mortgage market. host: i want to bring in a few callers on this subject for you. oklahoma city, oklahoma, democratic line. good morning, vernon. caller: i am tickled to death that the government is setting the rules for the financial industry when it comes to the home market. people worked all their lives to provide a home and held for ways to get it paid off before they retire. this is the one area that the government needs to regulate and regulate closely and i am glad we're finally doing that. now, of course, we have drawn a line in the sand that we can hopefully reclaim. can we hope that it will ever change back to what we thought we had been through? guest: an excellent question. another one to add to that is -- will the regulators have the appetite to regulate this closely? making sur
MSNBC
Jan 14, 2013 7:00pm PST
it the curb. and many thought president obama wanted to go over in order to raise taxes. to do the same thing over the debt ceiling and get full blame for it, it could genuinely destroy the republican party, of course while destroying the economy. >> there is that little problem, for republicans. so what about this point, ezra, that the president, the federal government could easily meet its obligations on actual debt payments through bonds and that sort of thing. but it would be the spending, the discretionary spending that they would have to cut under these circumstances. so there wouldn't ever be, many republicans insist they wouldn't ever be a realistic prospect of default in this. and that is why the president uses the word "obligations," instead of the word debt because they may just agree with them that there wouldn't actually be a debt default. >> it is unclear, we literally don't know what would happen because it never happened bef e before. so a legal authority is not all obvious. so there is a question, for the treasury department, to decide if we pay off the bond holders, but not
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)